13.4 the gold-salt trade

The gold-salt trade was an exchange of salt for gold between Mediterranean economies and West African countries during the Middle Ages. West African kingdoms, such as the Soninke empire of Ghana and the empire of Mali that succeeded it, were rich in gold but lacked salt, a commodity that countries around the Mediterranean had in plenty. 13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade Many items were traded between North Africa and West Africa, but the two goods that were most in demand were gold and salt. The North Africans wanted gold, which came from the forest region south of Ghana. The people in the forests wanted salt, which came from the Sahara. Salt from the Sahara desert was one of the major trade goods of ancient West Africa where very little naturally occurring deposits of the mineral could be found. Transported via camel caravans and by boat along such rivers as the Niger and Senegal, salt found its way to trading centres like Koumbi Saleh, Niani, and Timbuktu, where it was either passed further south or exchanged for other goods

-porcelain Salt more precious than gold. enhance food flavors,replace body salts,and preserve food - replace body salts -acquired in salt flats The source of Gold By: Emerson Logan Geno - preserve food Questions Wangara = source of gold. - enhance flavor Made coins of gold. 13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade Explain why salt was important to the people in the West African forest. Salt is needed to replace salt lost through perspiration. It also keeps food from spoiling, the people like its taste, and cattle need it. Explain why gold was important. Gold is important because it is used to make coins and to purchase silk and 13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade Many items were traded between North Africa and West Africa, but the two goods that were most in demand were gold and salt. The North Africans wanted gold, which came from the forest region south of Ghana. The people in the forests wanted salt, which came from the Sahara. Ghana made most of its money from the taxes it 13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade Fill in the voice bubbles. Have the North African trader explain why salt was important to the people in the West African forest. Have the Wangaran explain why gold was important. Have the king explain how Ghana became wealthy through trans-Saharan caravan trade. 13.5 The Exchange of Goods

By the 6th century AD, the lucrative trans-Saharan trade in gold, salt and slaves had begun, facilitating the rise of West Africa's great empires. There are a few 

Salt was important to the W.A. because they needed salt for their diets and they would loose so much salt when they sweat because of the extreme heat, so they craved and ate salt to get back what they had lost. tradition= merchants capture gold miners for location taxes=all goods At the designated trade location, the salt traders would display the salt they brought, beat their drums to announce their intention to trade, and return to their camp. The gold traders, hearing the drums, would show up, have a look at the salt, and place an amount of gold that they believe would be a fair trade. The gold-salt trade was an exchange of salt for gold between Mediterranean economies and West African countries during the Middle Ages. West African kingdoms, such as the Soninke empire of Ghana and the empire of Mali that succeeded it, were rich in gold but lacked salt, a commodity that countries around the Mediterranean had in plenty. 13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade Many items were traded between North Africa and West Africa, but the two goods that were most in demand were gold and salt. The North Africans wanted gold, which came from the forest region south of Ghana. The people in the forests wanted salt, which came from the Sahara.

Salt from the Sahara desert was one of the major trade goods of ancient West Africa where very little naturally occurring deposits of the mineral could be found. Transported via camel caravans and by boat along such rivers as the Niger and Senegal, salt found its way to trading centres like Koumbi Saleh, Niani, and Timbuktu, where it was either passed further south or exchanged for other goods

13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade Many items were traded between North Africa and West Africa, but the two goods that were most in demand were gold and salt. The North Africans wanted gold, which came from the forest region south of Ghana. The people in the forests wanted salt, which came from the Sahara. Salt from the Sahara desert was one of the major trade goods of ancient West Africa where very little naturally occurring deposits of the mineral could be found. Transported via camel caravans and by boat along such rivers as the Niger and Senegal, salt found its way to trading centres like Koumbi Saleh, Niani, and Timbuktu, where it was either passed further south or exchanged for other goods

13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade. Fill in the voice bubbles. Have the North African trader explain why salt was important to the people in the West African forest. Have the.

13.1 Introduction. 13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade Many items were traded between North Africa and West Africa, but the two goods that were most in demand were gold  13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade. Fill in the voice bubbles. Have the North African trader explain why salt was important to the people in the West African forest. Have the. From the seventh to the eleventh century, trans-Saharan trade linked the Mediterranean economies that demanded gold—and could supply salt—to the 

13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade. Fill in the voice bubbles. Have the North African trader explain why salt was important to the people in the West African forest. Have the.

Salt was important to the W.A. because they needed salt for their diets and they would loose so much salt when they sweat because of the extreme heat, so they craved and ate salt to get back what they had lost. tradition= merchants capture gold miners for location taxes=all goods At the designated trade location, the salt traders would display the salt they brought, beat their drums to announce their intention to trade, and return to their camp. The gold traders, hearing the drums, would show up, have a look at the salt, and place an amount of gold that they believe would be a fair trade.

West African gold to make coins. deposit a layer or mass of a material found in rock or in the ground. 13.4 The Gold-Salt Trade. Many items were traded between